Unable to sleep any longer, I was surprised to find my wife awake too. Normally, she has no trouble sleeping in on Saturday mornings. But not this time, she had been thinking about the upcoming storm and the need for sand bags most of the early morning. At first, I was a little annoyed because I wasn’t ready to think about emergency preparedness so early on a Saturday morning. I needed time, precious time, to wake up and process the information, challenging both my character and my competence.

But out of respect to Tammy, I decided to at least read the dire storm warnings from the local emergency management agencies. And sure enough, they were predicting all kinds of environmental mayhem and speaking of strange things like an atmospheric river and other climate aberrations. I now had motivation when previously I had none. At this point I resolved to take my wife’s visions of sand bags seriously.

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Happy with myself, I put on a confident smile and stood up straight and made my way outside to start shoveling the snow in the driveway and the walkway in the backyard. We have my wife’s daughter and her grandchildren temporarily living with us as she finds as place to live. And her two boys eagerly volunteered as well. The boys, my wife, and I were able to quickly clear those two areas, even though the boys with their short attention spans to a distance sliding contest when they found an area of smooth ice resistant to our best shoveling efforts.

Once we finished shoveling the snow, we were ready to sand bags. We jumped in the car and made to the nearest fire station. Quickly an assembly line was organized with our labor divided into bag holders, shovelers, and loaders. We worked like the dickens until we noticed our car was getting lower and lower, so we had to cut short our spectacular sandbagging efforts, even though nobody in our group had an ounce quit in them.

In our newly converted low rider, we rushed home self-satisfied with our antlike work ethic. Still riding our emergency preparedness high, we likewise unloaded our sand bags with incredible efficiency and strategically laid them in front of our garage area.

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As a Mormon, you live for frightful weather like this. It’s like a test of all your previous food storage and emergency preparedness training. Candles. Check. Hand-cranked radio. Check. Water supplies. Check. Freeze dried mac n’ cheese. Check. Prodigious amounts of instant chocolate pudding. Check! Check!

And now it was time, to wait for that river in the sky to drop its rain. And wait we did. But it never came as the weatherpersons predicted. Their predictions kept getting pushed out later and later in the day. The rains did not arrive until later that night.

When the rains came, they were a steady, heavy rains that brought more water than our feeble desert soils can normally absorb. So as a consequence, our rivers rose and our streets flooded. And we were stuck inside most of the day, driving each other bat crazy.

Luckily, my wife and I both had an out…for a while. We had both volunteered to help the Red Cross at the chapel since it has been designated as Carson City’s main emergency shelter for the storm.

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My shift was later in the afternoon. When I got there, the head Red Cross volunteer assigned me as the food liaison (I think my appearance gave her the impression I really like all things food). My duties were to help serve meals prepared by the Salvation Army and count meals served and report to the Red Cross the number of meals served since the Salvation Army was not willing to share that information with the Red Cross. I do not know why they weren’t sharing.

Only two people showed up and no meals were needed at the time (lucky for them I am sure I would have botched somehow). Much of my time volunteering, was spent talking to the other volunteers and saying the word “culvert” a lot while we checked our phones for alerts telling us which roads were flooded and closed off.

After many days, the rains and snow ceased. And me and my house survived, as did most houses. Of course, it’s still not over the weather people are predicting another atmospheric river next week, but I think the worst has a passed.