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Tammy and the boys went to Yellowstone this week and I got to stay home and help the homeless. I didn’t have enough annual leave to go seeing as I had to use it up when I was asked to “resign”. But I am not a bitter man. Tammy and the boys had a lot of fun doing all the Yellowstone things: seeing Old Faithful and other geysers, visiting the Canyon Waterfalls, going to the Tetons, and visiting Jackson Hole.

They saw a lot of wildlife: Buffalo, Marmots, Elk, and Antelope. They even got to catch a glimpse of some Grizzly bears and some Black bears.  On one occasion, they were coming around a bend and a Black Bear popped his head up right by the road.  Tammy stopped the car in the middle of the road and had Tyler take a couple of pictures from the passenger side of the car. When Tyler finished taking the pictures he noticed that Austin was on the floor of the car. When asked what he was doing on the floor, Austin said he didn’t want the bear to get him. We are glad the Black Bear didn’t get him and we are glad they got home safely.

Coincidentally, at the same time that Tammy and the boys were in Yellowstone there were two major incidents in the park. A 23 year-old man from Oregon fell into one of the hot springs. Taken at face value, it’s pretty hard to imagine how someone walking on the boardwalk one minute falls into the hot springs the next minute. But, then again I have had some incredibly clumsy moments when I have been in deep thought.

There was another incident in the park when a father and son got burned when they slipped into a hot pool. Supposedly the father was carrying his 13-year old son when he slipped. That’s a pretty big baby boy! Clearly, we were missing some key information.

Man-Cold

Meanwhile, I stayed home. Andrew was visiting for the weekend. We had a pretty good time playing basketball and NCAA Football 14 (can’t wait for NCAA football to make its comeback). He went to a football camp at UNR for partof Saturday and then spent the afternoon watching a TNT marathon of the Hobbit and the Lord of the Rings. I am not sure why but whenever he visits he ends up watching one of these shows. I have seen them so much that I can tell you all about Durin’s Day and have finally figured out that Gimli is the son of Gloin, one of the Dwarves in the Hobbit.

Soon after Andrew left, I got a man-cold. Feeling feeble and not wanting to make the man-cold worse without Tammy around, I did as little as possible laying around inexplicably binging on Mr. Selfridge shows and nursing myself with a Roman Punch for Kids recipe. The “doing as little as possible” kind of backfired on me when Tammy got home. She wasn’t as sympathetic as I had hoped she would be. In fact at one point I felt like she was mocking me.

More Family

But it wasn’t all for naught, I did figure out way to get my daughters married proper and bypass all the ups and downs of dating. In Sweden when they celebrate Midsummer, one of the customs they have for unmarried women (maidens) is to have them pick seven different flowers and then they are supposed to put the flowers under their pillow before they go to sleep on Midsummer’s Eve. Apparently, if you’ve picked the right set of flowers the man you are supposed to marry will come to you in your dreams. If he doesn’t then you’ve picked the wrong flowers.

Quotes and Church

“Those things which we call extraordinary, remarkable, or unusual may make history, but they do not make real life. After all, to do well those things which God ordained to be the common lot of all mankind, is the truest greatness. To be a successful father or a successful mother is greater than to be a successful general or a successful statesman.”—President Joseph F. Smith

Discussed “true greatness” this week in Elder’s Quorum and we had a good discussion given the recent spate of celebrity deaths (yes, this is what is going to happen when I am asked to teach Saturday afternoon. I going to go topical) and the fact that one of Muhammad Ali’s tag lines was “I am the Greatest”. Also had my balloon busted when a friend mentioned the other day that Walter Payton—“Sweetness”—one of my childhood idols was a hardcore womanizer. So we had to discuss that. It makes sense. Why should he have been different than the others? I am still in denial. Sometimes, it can be brutal coming out of the cocoon.

Greek-Odysseus

Family History

Well, I have a new family favorite name: Pluright J. Sisk. He was born in Culpeper County, Virginia in 1766 and died in Woodford County, Kentucky. He is our 5th great Grandfather through Mom’s side going through the Magee side of her family. Pluright married Ruth Boone in 1790 in Culpeper County.

Coincidentally, Ruth Boone (1769-1845), born in Berks County, Pennsylvania, was the granddaughter of George Boone IV, who was the brother of Squire Boone, the father of the great Daniel Boone. So the rumors are true we are related to Daniel Boone, just not directly. The Boone’s came to America from Exeter, Devonshire, England to escape religious persecution because of their Quaker faith.  George Boone III, who migrated with his family to Philadelphia in 1690, is our common ancestor. He is our 8th great Grandfather.

Music

  1. Blue Tail Fly (with the Jimmie crack corn chorus)—Burl Ives and the Andrew Sisters. Gotta have me some Burl Ives. Did not know this was a slave song.
  2. Atheist Don’t Have No Songs—Steep Canyon Rangers and Steve Martin. Heard Steve Martin perform this live. Steve Martin’s a genius. If you don’t like Steve Martin then you must hate Santa Claus, too.
  3.  Take My True Love By the Hand—The Limeliters. If you liked Glenn Yarborough’s singing in the Rankin Bass Hobbit movie you have to get this song. Plus it’s played during the last season of Breaking Bad, playing as Walt rolls his one remaining barrel through the desert toward his new ride after Hank is killed.
  4.  Bonny Hielan’ Laddie—The Kingston Trio. I belief my love for this type of folk music must begin with Dad’s Kingston Trio record that we had forever. Curiosity got the best of me.

I am not kidding these songs are on my Ipod and I do listen to them just ask the kids. More on folk music, why don’t we have kids sing folk songs anymore? It’s a great way to get in touch with your past, learn history, and pick up some good language skills. Europeans do it, why don’t we?

Scripture

 “For our light affliction, which is but for a moment, worketh for us a far more exceeding and eternal weight of glory; While we look not at the things which are seen, but at the things which are not seen: for the things which are seen are temporal; but the things which are not seen are eternal.” (2 Cor. 4:17–18.)”